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MellowWolf Publishing Notes for St. Augustine's Commentary on The Sermon on The Mount

MellowWolf Publishing Notes for St. Augustine's Commentary on The Sermon on The Mount

Augustine SrmnOnMount CoLaborListen All Apr 15, 2011


Rebbe Nachman's teachings on Psalms 37:10-11 help to show how this poverty in spirit and the spiritual meekness which Yehoshua blesses are the conditions for possessing the Land of Testimony unto the one true God.  The full magnitude of this blessing is in this, that the whole promise made by God's oath to and covenant with Abraham is fully realized in Abraham and the offspring of Abraham being called to the witness stand for the justification of the word of God and the salvation of Adam.


Excerpt from Augustine:                          Blessed Are the Poor in Spirit

What, then, does he say? "Blessed are the poor in spirit, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven." We read in Scripture concerning the striving after temporal things, "All is vanity and presumption of spirit;" but presumption of spirit means audacity and pride: usually also the proud are said to have great spirits; and rightly, inasmuch as the wind also is called spirit. 

And hence it is written, "Fire, hail, snow, ice, spirit of tempest." But, indeed, who does not know that the proud are spoken of as puffed up, as if swelled out with wind? 

And hence also that expression of the apostle,

"Knowledge puffs up, but charity builds up." And "the poor in spirit" are rightly understood here, as meaning the humble and God-fearing, i.e. those who have not the spirit which puffs up. Nor ought blessedness to begin at any other point whatever, if indeed it is to attain to the highest wisdom; "but the fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom;" for, on the other hand also, "pride" is entitled "the beginning of all sin." 

Let the proud, therefore, seek after and love the kingdoms of the earth; but "blessed are the poor in spirit, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven."

Note:
Listening with collaborative skill, to learn in the way another learns, requires an attitude of grace and charity.